Friday, October 20, 2017

Why Eating Eggs Might Not Raise Heart Disease Risk?


Whole egg consists of 2 main components: egg white and egg yolk. Egg white is a wonderful source of protein. Egg yolk contains not only essential nutrients like choline and lutein which are important for preserving our brain and eye health, but also important vitamins such as vitamins B2, B5, B12 and D.

But people have been told to limit intake of eggs because of high cholesterol in egg yolks. A single egg yolk has about 200 mg of cholesterol, making it as one of the richest sources of dietary cholesterol. High cholesterol is said to be a risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

In reality, dietary cholesterol and cholesterol in the blood are only weakly related. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that is found in all cells of the body. The body needs some cholesterol to make hormones, Vitamin-D, and substances that help digest foods. The body makes all the cholesterol it requires, though cholesterol can also be found in the food eaten (dietary cholesterol). The liver is stimulated to make cholesterol primarily by saturated fat and trans fat in the diet, not dietary cholesterol.

Eating foods high in cholesterol has very little impact on the blood cholesterol levels for most people. That is why the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015 removed the prior recommendation to limit consumption of dietary cholesterol to 300 mg per day. In about 70 percent of the population, foods rich in cholesterol like eggs cause only a subtle rise in cholesterol levels or none at all. In the other 30 percent, these foods do cause a rise in blood cholesterol levels. 

Some evidence suggests that eggs might even be beneficial because this raises levels of HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) that is associated with a lower risk of heart disease. Egg yolks are also rich in the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin that help eye health and protect against inflammation. Carotenoids need to be eaten with fat in order for the body to more fully absorb them, and a whole egg is the total package. Egg yolks contain a vibrant mix of saturated and unsaturated fat (about 5 grams per egg).

The risk of heart disease is influenced by the total lifestyle. It is a disease that has its root in inflammation and levels of inflammation are affected by weight, physical activity, the anti-oxidant levels in the diet and the type and amount of fats consumed.

Many huge studies that followed hundreds and thousands of people have found eating an egg a day is safe for most people. They did not find higher rates of heart attacks, strokes, or other cardiovascular diseases in people who eat up to an egg per day. A study by the University of Eastern Finland, for instance, reported that even carriers of the ApoE4 gene, which makes them highly susceptible to heart disease, egg and cholesterol intake was not linked to an increased risk of coronary artery disease. The findings were published online February 10, 2016 in the ‘American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’.

For the majority, an egg a day does not increase their risk of heart attack or stroke. But people who have difficulty controlling their total and LDL cholesterol, with diabetes, or already have heart disease, may want to be cautious about eating egg yolks and should instead choose foods made with egg whites. No more than 3 egg yolks per week is recommended.

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Feet Conditions May Uncover Signs Of Heart Disease

Knowing sign of heart disease early may help one lower risk of serious complications or even death. Sometimes, the signs of heart disease can be spotted through other parts of human body. For instance, the eye may reveal signs of heart disease. Likewise, the condition of one’s feet may uncover sign of heart disease. Find out more at:


Friday, October 06, 2017

15-Minute Walk For Heart Disease Prevention

Besides diet, exercise also play an important role in keeping one fit and healthy. The general consensus is that people should have 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week. Running, swimming, or sports like basketball, football, tennis, table tennis are all good forms of exercise. But for older folks or people who are not suitable for these activities, walking can be a good way to keep fit, too.

Studies using pedometer showed that people who achieve more steps throughout the day are less likely to be overweight, and are at a much lower risk of developing diseases like heart disease, stroke, cancer, Type-2 diabetes, and more. A pedometer is a small, beeper-sized device that counts the number of steps achieved.

The benefits of walking are often ignored because it is not regarded by most people as an aerobic exercise. The definition of aerobic exercise is one that stimulates the heart and respiratory rates to pump additional oxygen to muscles. Even a slow stroll does that. The faster one walks, the more aerobic the activity. Increased cardiovascular, respiratory, and circulatory operations mean nutrients go where they must to support the exercise. Energy is expensed rather than stored, and the organs, muscles, and bones are strengthened. 

A recent French 12-year study reported that just 15 minutes of moderate daily physical activity such as walking is associated with a 22 percent lower risk of death for people over 60 years of age. The study was conducted by researchers from Jean Monnet University in Saint-Etienne, France.

Walking 15 minutes may not lead to weight loss, though. For someone who performs strength-training exercises, eats healthily and leads an active life, walking 15 minutes daily can play a role in weight loss. For people who are lack of physical activity and adopts a high-calorie diet, daily 15-minute walks would unlikely lead to weight loss. But walking 15 minutes can still help burn some calories and maintain weight, especially if walking is the only form of exercise one has. Meanwhile, walking can also strengthen muscles, lungs and heart, and improve bone density and relieve stress.

Anyway, there may by a slight advantage if one can walk for 45 minutes or more. The body replaces the burned glycogen (sugar) either through the calories one eats or through breaking down some stored fat. If one eats more calorie than the body needs, it stores it right back again as fat.

If one has difficulty to set aside 45 minutes or even 30 minutes a day for walking, he or she can begin with 15-minute walk a day. Once the 15-minute walk habit is established, he or she can then increase the duration by another 15 minutes to make it a 30-minute walk or two 15-minute walks. In this way, people can get closer to the recommended 150 minutes per week of moderate aerobic activity. 

Sunday, October 01, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Knowing Heart Failure And Its Symptoms

The pumping action of heart is to ensure delivery of oxygen and nutrient-rich blood to the body’s cells so that it can function normally. When the heart fails, it cannot pump as well as it should be, and the cells in the body cannot receive sufficient blood. Click the following link to find out what is heart failure and its symptoms.


Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Can Raising NEAT Help Lose Weight?

Living in times of great convenience, most people can move from one place to another either by car or public transportation without too much walking and energy expenditure. Meanwhile, modern people are prone to sedentary lifestyle, spending too much time sitting down. An average of 10 to 15 hours a day are spent sitting in office, in transportation, watching television, browsing or surfing the internet at home. Such lifestyle, together with unhealthy diet, has created obesity epidemic. Obesity can lead to many complications including Type-2 diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and stroke.

If a person sits for too long, his or her body’s natural thermogenesis (calorie-burning capability) is suppressed, and he or she cannot incite the body’s full capacity to burn calories. In order to prevent from getting weight gain, people need to have more physical activities on a daily basis.

A study that was published 2012 in the online journal ‘BMJ Open’ reported that people who reduce excessive sitting to less than 3 hours a day live 2 years longer and the gain in life expectancy from reducing excessive television viewing to less than 2 hours a day is 1.38 years. Sitting for extended periods of time has been linked with heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity, according to researchers.

Most experts encourage people to engage with vigorous exercise several times a week to keep fit and avoid gaining weight. But there is another way for one to burn more calories all day long: increasing NEAT time by moving more and sitting less. The theory behind this is simple: it takes energy (calories) to move even the smallest muscle.

Research published in journal ‘Archives of Internal Medicine’ (now known as JAMA Internal Medicine) found that the amount of everyday activity a person gets, beyond the 30 minutes of traditional exercise, might matter even more for his or her overall health than trips to the gym.

NEAT, which stands for non-exercise activity thermogenesis, is the energy a person expends each day for everything that is not sleeping, eating, or sports-like activities. These are non-exercise activities that would normally be performed each day. According to researchers at the Mayo Clinic, NEAT could play a major role in whether or not a person loses or gains weight.

Depending on everyone’s activity level, calories burned from increasing NEAT time each day can range from 1,500 to 2,400 calories. According to the American Heart Association, obese individuals tend to be seated for 2.5 hours per day more than sedentary lean counterparts. Researchers estimated that if obese individuals could adopt the NEAT habits, they could burn an additional 350 calories per day.

There are many things that can raise the NEAT. For instance, one can use the stairs instead of escalator or elevator. This would probably help burn an extra 50 to 100 calories on average each day. Other things like walking, washing dishes, doing garden work, or playing with kids can all increase the NEAT.

Monday, September 25, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - How Is Stroke Related To Heart Disease?

It is common for heart problems including heart attack, congestive heart failure, abnormal heart rhythms, and cardiac arrest to occur immediately after a stroke. These heart problems may be caused by the stroke itself, or by the same underlying process that induced the stroke, or the heart problem may occur first to cause the stroke. More details at:


Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Can Drinking Coffee Or Tea Lower Stroke Risk?

Coffee and tea are 2 of the popular beverages around the world. But coffee and most kinds of tea contains caffeine, of which its health effects have remained controversial.

Some studies reported that caffeine is bad for the health. For instance, studies indicated that consuming more than 500 to 600 mg of caffeine a day may lead to insomnia, nervousness, restlessness, irritability, an upset stomach, a fast heartbeat and even muscle tremors. Yet there are favorable health reports on caffeine. A study showed that people who drank 3 to 5 cups of coffee a day were less likely to have a buildup of calcium in the vessels that bring blood to the heart muscle. That could mean a lower chance of heart disease. Research also indicated that coffee and green tea might help prevent breast and prostate cancers, while all kinds of tea may protect one against the kinds of cancer that affect the ovaries and stomach.

On March 14, 2013, a paper published in ‘American Heart Association's journal Stroke’ reported that a cup of coffee or 4 cups of green tea a day may reduce the risk of stroke by 20 percent.

Japanese researchers looked at the drinking habits of 82,369 Japanese adults aged between 45 and 74 over a 13-year period. These participants were free from cardiovascular disease or cancer in 1995 and 1998. Over the course of study, they kept track of hospital records, death certificates and data about deaths from heart disease and stroke. 

During an average of 13 years of follow-up, they found that those who had at least 1 cup of coffee a day lowered their risk for stroke about 20 percent. And, compared to those who rarely drank green tea, people who drank 2 to 3 cups a day had a 14 percent lower risk of stroke and people who drank at least 4 cups lowered their risk by 20 percent. 

Risk for a type of stroke called a hemorrhagic stroke was cut by 32 percent among those who drank a cup of coffee or 2 cups of green tea daily. Hemorrhagic stroke, which accounts for about 13 percent of stroke, is a condition in which a blood vessel in the brain bursts and blood floods part of the brain. 

The researchers claimed that both drinks helped protect from the risk of heart attacks. Their findings also suggested regularly drinking both coffee and green tea could provide the greatest benefit possibly due to an interaction effect for each other.

All the results were arrived after taking into account of factors like age, sex, smoking, alcohol, weight, diet and exercise. In the study, green tea drinkers were more likely to exercise than non-drinkers. 

While it is unclear how green tea affects stroke risk, researchers suspected that green tea contains catechins that may provide some protection to blood vessels. Several chemicals in coffee are believed to offer a boost to health, including caffeine and chlorogenic acid, which researchers suggest could help cut stroke risks by lowering the chances of developing Type-2 diabetes.

Sunday, September 03, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Can Natural Remedies Manage Hypertension?

According to a published paper, about 75 to 80 percent of the world population use herbal (alternative) medicines, mainly in developing countries, for primary health care because of their better acceptability with human body and lesser side effects. Can natural remedies really manage hypertension? Find out more at:

Saturday, August 26, 2017

Which Diet Could Prevent Heart Disease?

Heart disease is the number one killers globally. People who are smokers, overweight or obese, have diabetes, high blood pressure are at a higher risk of developing heart disease. To prevent heart disease, one should not only have more physical activities but also follow a heart-healthy diet. 

When it comes to heart-healthy diets, there are so many different varieties, for instance, low-fat diets, low-carb diets, Mediterranean diets, and many others. When facing so many alternatives, people may find it hard to decide which diet should they adopt.

Following a heart-healthy diet may, however, not be as confusing as one may image. First of all, let us look at some of the diets.

Carb (carbohydrate) is one of the 3 macronutrients (the other 2 are protein and fat). Main purpose of carbs is to provide energy. Most carbs get broken down or transformed into glucose that can be used as energy. Carbs can also be turned into fat (stored energy) for later use.

Among carbs, there are whole and refined carbs. Being unprocessed, whole carbs contain the fiber found naturally in the food (vegetables, whole fruit, legumes, potatoes and whole grains). Refined carbs, on the other hand, have been processed and had the natural fiber stripped out. Good examples of refined carbs include sugar-sweetened beverages, fruit juices, pastries, white bread, white pasta, white rice.

Numerous studies show that refined carb consumption is associated with health problems like obesity and Type-2 diabetes but hundreds of studies have also reported that eating high-fiber carbs like vegetables, fruits, legumes and whole grains could lead to improved metabolic health and a lower risk of disease. Likewise, scientists have found that some fats are actually good for the body, for instance, omega-3 fatty acids. As a result, the contemporary dietary recommendations from proponents of the low-carb diets and the low-fat diets increasingly resemble each other.

The renowned Mediterranean Diet, a diet incorporates the traditional healthy living habits of people from countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, can be viewed at a compromise between low-fat and low-carb. Despite some variations by region, a typical Mediterranean diet involves eating plenty of starchy foods, such as bread and pasta (wholegrains varieties), plenty of fruit and vegetables, some fish, less meat, and choosing products made from vegetable and plant oils, such as olive oil. A 2013 study found that people following a Mediterranean diet had a 30 percent lower risk of heart disease and stroke.

It is not necessary to strictly follow any of the diets mentioned. A heart-healthy diet can simply be one that people eat only enough calories to keep a healthy weight, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, use wholegrain breads and pastas, eat omega-3 rich fish, chicken and legumes as primary protein source, eat less red meats, and of course, avoid trans fats and processed foods. Limiting alcohol intake and eating some nuts may help improve the heart-healthy diet, too.

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - SCAD A Typical Heart Attack Striking Mostly Females

Unlike a more typical heart attack caused by a buildup of plaque in the arteries, a SCAD heart attack starts with a tear in an artery. The tear blocks the artery and blood flow to the heart, leading to a heart attack. Victims of SCAD are often thin, appear heathy, and have no risk factors like smoking and diabetes. More at:


Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Is Fish The Only Source Of Omega3 Fat For Heart Disease Prevention?

Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fats that that may reduce inflammation throughout the body. Inflammation in the body can damage the blood vessels and lead to heart disease and strokes. 

Research has shown that omega-3 fatty acids decrease risk of arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats) that can lead to sudden death, decrease triglyceride levels, slow growth rate of atherosclerotic plaque, and lower blood pressure (slightly). Hence, omega-3 fatty acids are not only essential for the brain and nervous system function properly but also good for heart disease prevention.

When talking about omega-3 fatty acids, people usually think of fish. Being a good source of protein, fish are some of the richest sources of 2 forms of omega-3 fatty acids called docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Fatty fish, such as salmon, lake trout, halibut, herring, sardines and tuna, contain the most omega-3 fatty acids.

Despite of the health benefits of fish, people should not eat too much fish. This is because most fish come from ocean, and many parts of the ocean are contaminated by pollution. Some types of fish may contain high levels of mercury, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), dioxins and other environmental contaminants. Consumption too much of these fish may be harmful for the body.

According to health experts, the risk of getting too much mercury or other contaminations from fish is generally outweighed by the health benefits that omega-3 fatty acids have if people consume fish in moderation. That is why the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends eating 2 servings of fish every week for adults. A serving size is 3.5 ounces (99 grams).

Eating a variety of fish will generally help minimize any potentially adverse effects due to environmental pollutants. 5 of the most commonly eaten fish or shellfish that are low in mercury are shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, pollock, and catfish. Avoid eating shark, swordfish, king Mackerel, or tilefish because they contain high levels of mercury. Nevertheless, any fish can be unhealthy depending on how it is prepared. For example, broiling or baking fish is a healthier option than is deep-frying.

For people who do not like or are sensitive to fish, there are other non-fish options. Plants like flaxseed oil, chia seeds, walnuts, soybeans and spinach do contain high omega-3 fatty acids. These plants create alpha-linolenic acid (ALA. Although human body can convert ALA to DHA or EPA as needed, fish are probably still the best source of omega-3s. 

Meanwhile, there are health supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids. However, the evidence of heart-healthy benefits from eating these foods is not as strong as it is from eating fish.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Is Health Anxiety A Risk Factor For Heart Disease?

Research shows that anxiety disorders generally may help trigger or worsen cardiovascular disease. A recent study, however, found that healthy people who have health anxiety may be linked to development of heart disease, too. Find out more about their relationship by clicking the following link:


Thursday, August 10, 2017

How Does Panic Attack Differ From Heart Attack?

Heart attack is a serious condition that occurs as a result of coronary heart disease. It requires immediate medical attention, otherwise the victim might end up with disability or even death. Panic attack, on the other hand, is a form of anxiety that is triggered by a stressful event, and it poses no immediate danger.

Both attacks have very similar symptoms making it difficult for anyone to differentiate. However, they are some key differences. For instance, both attack sufferers can have intense chest pain. Chest pain associated with an actual heart attack is often described as crushing. The feeling may radiate into the rest of the chest, arms, back, neck, and even teeth. Chest pain during a panic attack tends to feel more localized. It is more limited to a certain area of the chest.

Meanwhile, the symptoms are more likely to surprise one with a sudden onset in a panic attack. Symptoms typically only last around 10 minutes. A heart attack may start with minor discomfort, and builds up into severe pain over a few minutes. It can last up to a couple of hours. A 5- to 10-minute of deep, active breathing should loosen up the tightened chest, and the panic attack will slowly start to subside. If after 5-minutes of breathing, the body has not shown any signs of improvement, then it may be a heart attack. 

Nausea may occur in both heart attack and panic attack. It is more common for heart attack sufferers to end up vomiting though it can rarely occur in some panic attack victims, too. People with panic attack may have an intense feeling of fear or anxiety, and they are more likely to have hyperventilation.

It is less common for those with panic attack to faint, but victims of heart attack can always experience lightheadedness or even lose consciousness. Panic attack usually starts in the younger ages, and heart attack tends to happen to those with ill health, who are obese and those in the elderly.

A heart attack can actually lead to a panic attack due to the fear and anxiety but a panic attack cannot cause heart attack. Nevertheless, if one has an underlying heart issue, panic attack may stress the body and can aggravate an existing heart condition. So, people who have an existing heart condition should talk to their doctor if they are experiencing panic attack.

Diagnosis of panic attack patients include a psychological evaluation using questionnaires or consultations with a psychiatrist. But doctors must first rule out a heart attack, stroke or asthma attack before a panic disorder can be considered. Treatment for panic attack can be carried out through a combination of drugs and therapy. Patients on medication often show marked improvement. Therapy that involves challenging unhelpful thoughts or relaxation techniques like breathing exercises can also help.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

How Is Atrial Fibrillation Linked To Cryptogenic Stroke?

Stroke or also known as brain attack, occurs when the supply of blood to the brain is interrupted or reduced because either the blood supply is blocked or blood vessel within the brain ruptures. When this happens, the brain does not get enough oxygen or nutrients causing brain cells to die.

There are 3 main kinds of stroke, namely ischemic strokes caused by blockages or narrowing of the arteries, hemorrhagic strokes caused by arteries in the brain either leaking blood or bursting open, and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), also referred to as mini-strokes. TIAs produce short-lived stroke symptoms and usually do not bring permanent injury to the brain. They, however, do serve as warning signs for future strokes and indicate that there is a partially blocked artery or clot source in the heart. 

It is interesting to note that about 30 to 40 percent of ischemic strokes, and nearly half of all TIAs are cryptogenic. A cryptogenic stroke is one for which there is no apparent underlying cause. 

Being one of the potential causes of cryptogenic stroke, atrial fibrillation (AF) is hard to detect because of its symptomless. It may come and go at random, or they can be chronic and range from several days in length to being present all the time. It causes one of every 6 strokes usually major. As many as 8 of every 10 patients with a stroke brought on by AF die or are disabled. Other causes for cryptogenic stroke include Patent Foreman Ovale (PFO), inherited thrombophilias, aortic arch plaque, infectious, autoimmune and inflammatory states.

When AF occurs, blood flow from one chamber of the heart to the next and from the heart to the rest of the body becomes inconsistent. This may cause blood to pool in the upper chamber of the heart known as atria and starts to clot. Pieces that break off from a clot may travel through arteries and eventually arrive at the brain. If a clot becomes entrapped, it blocks the flow of blood to the part of the brain that vessel supplies. This causes a stroke.

Underlying heart disease and age are the 2 major risk factors, though AF can happen at any age without any apparent cause. AF can be sporadic and difficult to pinpoint. However, if one can watch out for symptoms like quivering or fluttering heartbeat, feeling like your heart is racing or beating irregularly, fluttering or thumping in the chest, dizziness, shortness of breath, anxiety, fainting (a result of less blood getting to the brain), and confusion (another result of less blood to the brain), and inform doctor accordingly may save his or her life. 

Doctors can use ECG to show AF even when there are no symptoms. But monitoring the heart for signs of AF may require more than the 24 hours, which was recommended by the previous guidelines. Some research suggested monitoring for a period of over 30 days may reveal 5 times more cases of AF in patients. Patients who are diagnosed with AF could take anticoagulation medicines to help keep that first stroke from happening, reducing the risk by at least 50 percent.

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Eating Avocado For Heart Disease Prevention?

Avocado is a naturally nutrient-dense food and contains nearly 20 vitamins and minerals. Because of its high mono- and polyunsaturated fats, avocado may help lower blood cholesterol levels and reduce risk for heart disease. Moreover, avocado can help regulate blood sugar, manage blood pressure, improve immune system, reduce risk of certain cancer, and is an anti-inflammatory agent. It can be great for vision, too. Find out more at:


Saturday, July 15, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - What People Should And Should Not Do To Lose Weight?

Losing weight means burning more calories. The body burns calories during exercise to fuel the activity. Even after exercising, the body is still burning more calories. While exercising is paramount, diet also plays a part in managing weight. Eating protein-rich diet can help burn... Read more at:


Friday, July 07, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Atrial Flutter Is Just Another Kind Of Arrhythmia

Talking about arrhythmia, most people will first think of atrial fibrillation, which is the most common one. But besides atrial fibrillation, there are other types of arrhythmia. One of the less common one is atrial flutter. Atrial flutter has similar symptoms as atrial fibrillation, like feeling faint, tiredness, palpitations, shortness of breath... To know more, click the following link:


Saturday, July 01, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Is Air Pollution A Risk Factor For Heart Disease?

Inhaling air pollutants that are poisonous, as reported by researchers for the past 30 years, can pose many health problems including respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, adverse pregnancy outcomes and even death. A scientific statement by the American Heart Association (AHA), which was released in 2004 and updated in 2010, warns public the risk of air pollution… Find out more at:


Saturday, June 17, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Why Controlling Diabetes Is Important For Heart Disease Prevention?

Coronary artery disease is the major cause of death in patients with diabetes. It can lead to heart attack, heart failure or angina. The risk of developing coronary artery disease in diabetic patients is known to be several times higher at every level of cholesterol. That is why controlling diabetes is important. Read more at:


Saturday, June 10, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Can Nuts And Seeds Help Prevent Heart Disease?

Nuts and seeds are usually consumed as snack. But very often, people are told not to have too much of them because of their high fat and caloric content. In fact, eating them may help increase lifespan, lower the risk for cardiovascular disease and cancer, help in weight loss, and good for diabetes management.


Heart Disease Prevention - Can Garlic Help Prevent Heart Disease?

In additional to its culinary uses, garlic has been used to treat illness and disease for thousands of years. To date, many favorable experimental and clinical effects of garlic preparations, including garlic extract, have been reported. These biological responses have been largely attributed to reduction of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases like heart disease, stroke and cancer… Find out more at:


Friday, May 19, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - What Is Tetralogy of Fallot?

Being a defect that affects the functioning of heart valve, Tetralogy of Fallot is the most common types of congenital heart defects that refers to 4 heart defects present from the time of birth: a ventricular septal defect, pulmonary stenosis, right ventricular hypertrophy, and an overriding aorta. Click the following link to find out more about the disease.


Friday, May 12, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Can Cabbage Prevent Heart Disease?

As a plant, cabbage is commonly used as a vegetable. In medicine, it can be used to treat for stomach pain, excess stomach acid, stomach and intestinal ulcers, asthma and morning sickness. And there is an increasing number of studies link cabbage intake to a lower risk of several cardiovascular diseases. Find out more at:


Thursday, April 27, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention -Can One Rely On Coconut To Prevent Heart Disease?

People used to stay away from coconut products because they are unhealthy. Lately, coconut seems to return as a health food, and coconut-based products have become increasingly popular. Proponents of coconut claim that coconut contains healthy fats that are good for the heart, protect against illnesses like Alzheimer’s, arthritis and diabetes, and can even aid weight loss. But can you rely on coconut to prevent heart disease? Find out more at:


Friday, April 21, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Why Low Blood Pressure Is Sometimes Undesirable?

For many people, low blood pressure can signal an underlying problem, especially when it drops suddenly or is accompanied by signs and symptoms. A sudden fall in blood pressure by just 20 mmHg can cause dizziness and fainting when the brain fails to receive an adequate supply of blood. In severe cases, low blood pressure can be life-threatening. Find out why by clicking the following link:


Thursday, April 13, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Is Eating Chocolate For Heart Disease Prevention A Myth?

Chocolate is one of the most popular food in the world, but very often, it is being accused of unhealthy. Sufficient evidence has surfaced recently to convince most cardiologists regarding the potential cardiovascular benefits of chocolate. Several studies, generally observational, have linked chocolate consumption to reduced high blood pressure. Can chocolate really prevent heart disease? Read more at:


Friday, March 31, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Is It Safe To Use Herbal Medicine For Heart Disease Prevention?

Many people believe that products labelled as natural are always safe and good for them. A recent paper published online February 27, 2017 in the ‘Journal of the American College of Cardiology’ suggested that 1 in every 5 American adults have used an herbal or dietary supplement in their lifetime, and 70 percent of patients do not tell their doctors about supplement use. Is it safe to use them for heart disease prevention? Read more at:


Thursday, March 23, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - How Is Efferocytosis Linked To Heart Disease?

Despite of good control of cholesterol and other risk factors, some individuals’ arteries continue to progressively narrow. Obviously, there ought to be other mechanisms beyond the conventional risk factors that cause heart attack and stroke. First, it is necessary to understand a term called “efferocytosis”. Learn more at:


Friday, March 17, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Alcohol Dependence In Young Adulthood Might Lead To Heart Disease!

Moderate amount of alcohol, including red wines, might benefit the heart. But none of the health organizations has recommended drinking alcohol just to prevent heart disease. Years of alcohol dependence during young adulthood could result in silent but permanent injuries, in later life, leading to serious health problems. Find out more at:


Thursday, March 09, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Will Skipping Breakfast Lead To Heart Disease?

One of the most common reasons cited by people skipping breakfast is that they are not hungry at all. But being the first meal of the day, breakfast is supposed to be the most important meal. So, is skipping breakfast a good habit and will that affect the health? Find out the answer at:


Thursday, March 02, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - How Olive Oil Is Important For Heart Disease Prevention?

Being low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat and dietary fiber, Mediterranean diet is often praised to be a healthy diet. One of main reasons is that olive oil contains monounsaturated fats, most notably oleic acid. To find out how olive oil is important for heart disease prevention, click the following link:


Thursday, February 23, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - How Eating Brown Rice Can Prevent Heart Disease?

Brown rice has been advocated as healthier alternatives starting in the 19th century. A study conducted by the ‘American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’ reported that brown rice is the top choice in terms of both nutritional and other inherent healthy benefits. Can eating brown rice prevent heart disease? More details at:


Friday, February 10, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - What Cause People To Gain Weight?

Lack of physical activities and unhealthy diet may be the main reasons why people tend to gain weight. There are, however, other causes that can cause one to put on weight. What are they? 

Friday, February 03, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - How Is Stress Linked To Heart Disease?

While there is no direct link between stress and heart disease, according to the American Heart Association, chronic stress can negatively affect the health and can cause issues that can lead to heart disease. Click the following link for more details:


Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Less Added Sugar For Heart Disease Prevention!

Research has shown that excessive added sugar is bad for the health, especially the heart. For instance, people will gain weight or even be obese with excessive intake of sugar. Weight gain is often linked to other chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke and even certain types of cancer. Find out more at:


Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - What To Eat To Prevent High Cholesterol And Heart Disease?

Human body, and especially the liver, makes all the cholesterol it needs. But cholesterol can also be found in foods from animal sources. As such, making healthy eating choices is paramount. Recent trials that tested the impact of specific foods on blood cholesterol found that eating more nuts, legumes, olive oil, and plant sterols can help reduce blood cholesterol. More details at:


Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Would Consumption of Butter Lead To Heart Disease?

People have been advised to stay away butter since the 1950s because it is full of saturated fats that could make us fatter and more prone to heart disease. However, a recent study suggested that that butter has relatively small or neutral association with mortality, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Find out more at:

Wednesday, January 04, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Can Mobile Health Devices Detect And Prevent Heart Disease?

In the past, it is difficult to use sensors and front-end electronics in wearable technology to gather physiological and movement data because of their size. But now, wearable sensors are available at much lower cost and utilized in digital health monitoring systems with miniature circuits, microcontroller functions, front-end amplification and wireless data transmission. Nevertheless, can mobile health devices detect and prevent heart disease? Find out more at: