Friday, October 20, 2017

Why Eating Eggs Might Not Raise Heart Disease Risk?


Whole egg consists of 2 main components: egg white and egg yolk. Egg white is a wonderful source of protein. Egg yolk contains not only essential nutrients like choline and lutein which are important for preserving our brain and eye health, but also important vitamins such as vitamins B2, B5, B12 and D.

But people have been told to limit intake of eggs because of high cholesterol in egg yolks. A single egg yolk has about 200 mg of cholesterol, making it as one of the richest sources of dietary cholesterol. High cholesterol is said to be a risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

In reality, dietary cholesterol and cholesterol in the blood are only weakly related. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that is found in all cells of the body. The body needs some cholesterol to make hormones, Vitamin-D, and substances that help digest foods. The body makes all the cholesterol it requires, though cholesterol can also be found in the food eaten (dietary cholesterol). The liver is stimulated to make cholesterol primarily by saturated fat and trans fat in the diet, not dietary cholesterol.

Eating foods high in cholesterol has very little impact on the blood cholesterol levels for most people. That is why the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015 removed the prior recommendation to limit consumption of dietary cholesterol to 300 mg per day. In about 70 percent of the population, foods rich in cholesterol like eggs cause only a subtle rise in cholesterol levels or none at all. In the other 30 percent, these foods do cause a rise in blood cholesterol levels. 

Some evidence suggests that eggs might even be beneficial because this raises levels of HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) that is associated with a lower risk of heart disease. Egg yolks are also rich in the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin that help eye health and protect against inflammation. Carotenoids need to be eaten with fat in order for the body to more fully absorb them, and a whole egg is the total package. Egg yolks contain a vibrant mix of saturated and unsaturated fat (about 5 grams per egg).

The risk of heart disease is influenced by the total lifestyle. It is a disease that has its root in inflammation and levels of inflammation are affected by weight, physical activity, the anti-oxidant levels in the diet and the type and amount of fats consumed.

Many huge studies that followed hundreds and thousands of people have found eating an egg a day is safe for most people. They did not find higher rates of heart attacks, strokes, or other cardiovascular diseases in people who eat up to an egg per day. A study by the University of Eastern Finland, for instance, reported that even carriers of the ApoE4 gene, which makes them highly susceptible to heart disease, egg and cholesterol intake was not linked to an increased risk of coronary artery disease. The findings were published online February 10, 2016 in the ‘American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’.

For the majority, an egg a day does not increase their risk of heart attack or stroke. But people who have difficulty controlling their total and LDL cholesterol, with diabetes, or already have heart disease, may want to be cautious about eating egg yolks and should instead choose foods made with egg whites. No more than 3 egg yolks per week is recommended.

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Feet Conditions May Uncover Signs Of Heart Disease

Knowing sign of heart disease early may help one lower risk of serious complications or even death. Sometimes, the signs of heart disease can be spotted through other parts of human body. For instance, the eye may reveal signs of heart disease. Likewise, the condition of one’s feet may uncover sign of heart disease. Find out more at:


Friday, October 06, 2017

15-Minute Walk For Heart Disease Prevention

Besides diet, exercise also play an important role in keeping one fit and healthy. The general consensus is that people should have 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week. Running, swimming, or sports like basketball, football, tennis, table tennis are all good forms of exercise. But for older folks or people who are not suitable for these activities, walking can be a good way to keep fit, too.

Studies using pedometer showed that people who achieve more steps throughout the day are less likely to be overweight, and are at a much lower risk of developing diseases like heart disease, stroke, cancer, Type-2 diabetes, and more. A pedometer is a small, beeper-sized device that counts the number of steps achieved.

The benefits of walking are often ignored because it is not regarded by most people as an aerobic exercise. The definition of aerobic exercise is one that stimulates the heart and respiratory rates to pump additional oxygen to muscles. Even a slow stroll does that. The faster one walks, the more aerobic the activity. Increased cardiovascular, respiratory, and circulatory operations mean nutrients go where they must to support the exercise. Energy is expensed rather than stored, and the organs, muscles, and bones are strengthened. 

A recent French 12-year study reported that just 15 minutes of moderate daily physical activity such as walking is associated with a 22 percent lower risk of death for people over 60 years of age. The study was conducted by researchers from Jean Monnet University in Saint-Etienne, France.

Walking 15 minutes may not lead to weight loss, though. For someone who performs strength-training exercises, eats healthily and leads an active life, walking 15 minutes daily can play a role in weight loss. For people who are lack of physical activity and adopts a high-calorie diet, daily 15-minute walks would unlikely lead to weight loss. But walking 15 minutes can still help burn some calories and maintain weight, especially if walking is the only form of exercise one has. Meanwhile, walking can also strengthen muscles, lungs and heart, and improve bone density and relieve stress.

Anyway, there may by a slight advantage if one can walk for 45 minutes or more. The body replaces the burned glycogen (sugar) either through the calories one eats or through breaking down some stored fat. If one eats more calorie than the body needs, it stores it right back again as fat.

If one has difficulty to set aside 45 minutes or even 30 minutes a day for walking, he or she can begin with 15-minute walk a day. Once the 15-minute walk habit is established, he or she can then increase the duration by another 15 minutes to make it a 30-minute walk or two 15-minute walks. In this way, people can get closer to the recommended 150 minutes per week of moderate aerobic activity. 

Sunday, October 01, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Knowing Heart Failure And Its Symptoms

The pumping action of heart is to ensure delivery of oxygen and nutrient-rich blood to the body’s cells so that it can function normally. When the heart fails, it cannot pump as well as it should be, and the cells in the body cannot receive sufficient blood. Click the following link to find out what is heart failure and its symptoms.


Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Can Raising NEAT Help Lose Weight?

Living in times of great convenience, most people can move from one place to another either by car or public transportation without too much walking and energy expenditure. Meanwhile, modern people are prone to sedentary lifestyle, spending too much time sitting down. An average of 10 to 15 hours a day are spent sitting in office, in transportation, watching television, browsing or surfing the internet at home. Such lifestyle, together with unhealthy diet, has created obesity epidemic. Obesity can lead to many complications including Type-2 diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and stroke.

If a person sits for too long, his or her body’s natural thermogenesis (calorie-burning capability) is suppressed, and he or she cannot incite the body’s full capacity to burn calories. In order to prevent from getting weight gain, people need to have more physical activities on a daily basis.

A study that was published 2012 in the online journal ‘BMJ Open’ reported that people who reduce excessive sitting to less than 3 hours a day live 2 years longer and the gain in life expectancy from reducing excessive television viewing to less than 2 hours a day is 1.38 years. Sitting for extended periods of time has been linked with heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity, according to researchers.

Most experts encourage people to engage with vigorous exercise several times a week to keep fit and avoid gaining weight. But there is another way for one to burn more calories all day long: increasing NEAT time by moving more and sitting less. The theory behind this is simple: it takes energy (calories) to move even the smallest muscle.

Research published in journal ‘Archives of Internal Medicine’ (now known as JAMA Internal Medicine) found that the amount of everyday activity a person gets, beyond the 30 minutes of traditional exercise, might matter even more for his or her overall health than trips to the gym.

NEAT, which stands for non-exercise activity thermogenesis, is the energy a person expends each day for everything that is not sleeping, eating, or sports-like activities. These are non-exercise activities that would normally be performed each day. According to researchers at the Mayo Clinic, NEAT could play a major role in whether or not a person loses or gains weight.

Depending on everyone’s activity level, calories burned from increasing NEAT time each day can range from 1,500 to 2,400 calories. According to the American Heart Association, obese individuals tend to be seated for 2.5 hours per day more than sedentary lean counterparts. Researchers estimated that if obese individuals could adopt the NEAT habits, they could burn an additional 350 calories per day.

There are many things that can raise the NEAT. For instance, one can use the stairs instead of escalator or elevator. This would probably help burn an extra 50 to 100 calories on average each day. Other things like walking, washing dishes, doing garden work, or playing with kids can all increase the NEAT.

Monday, September 25, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - How Is Stroke Related To Heart Disease?

It is common for heart problems including heart attack, congestive heart failure, abnormal heart rhythms, and cardiac arrest to occur immediately after a stroke. These heart problems may be caused by the stroke itself, or by the same underlying process that induced the stroke, or the heart problem may occur first to cause the stroke. More details at:


Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Can Drinking Coffee Or Tea Lower Stroke Risk?

Coffee and tea are 2 of the popular beverages around the world. But coffee and most kinds of tea contains caffeine, of which its health effects have remained controversial.

Some studies reported that caffeine is bad for the health. For instance, studies indicated that consuming more than 500 to 600 mg of caffeine a day may lead to insomnia, nervousness, restlessness, irritability, an upset stomach, a fast heartbeat and even muscle tremors. Yet there are favorable health reports on caffeine. A study showed that people who drank 3 to 5 cups of coffee a day were less likely to have a buildup of calcium in the vessels that bring blood to the heart muscle. That could mean a lower chance of heart disease. Research also indicated that coffee and green tea might help prevent breast and prostate cancers, while all kinds of tea may protect one against the kinds of cancer that affect the ovaries and stomach.

On March 14, 2013, a paper published in ‘American Heart Association's journal Stroke’ reported that a cup of coffee or 4 cups of green tea a day may reduce the risk of stroke by 20 percent.

Japanese researchers looked at the drinking habits of 82,369 Japanese adults aged between 45 and 74 over a 13-year period. These participants were free from cardiovascular disease or cancer in 1995 and 1998. Over the course of study, they kept track of hospital records, death certificates and data about deaths from heart disease and stroke. 

During an average of 13 years of follow-up, they found that those who had at least 1 cup of coffee a day lowered their risk for stroke about 20 percent. And, compared to those who rarely drank green tea, people who drank 2 to 3 cups a day had a 14 percent lower risk of stroke and people who drank at least 4 cups lowered their risk by 20 percent. 

Risk for a type of stroke called a hemorrhagic stroke was cut by 32 percent among those who drank a cup of coffee or 2 cups of green tea daily. Hemorrhagic stroke, which accounts for about 13 percent of stroke, is a condition in which a blood vessel in the brain bursts and blood floods part of the brain. 

The researchers claimed that both drinks helped protect from the risk of heart attacks. Their findings also suggested regularly drinking both coffee and green tea could provide the greatest benefit possibly due to an interaction effect for each other.

All the results were arrived after taking into account of factors like age, sex, smoking, alcohol, weight, diet and exercise. In the study, green tea drinkers were more likely to exercise than non-drinkers. 

While it is unclear how green tea affects stroke risk, researchers suspected that green tea contains catechins that may provide some protection to blood vessels. Several chemicals in coffee are believed to offer a boost to health, including caffeine and chlorogenic acid, which researchers suggest could help cut stroke risks by lowering the chances of developing Type-2 diabetes.

Sunday, September 03, 2017

Heart Disease Prevention - Can Natural Remedies Manage Hypertension?

According to a published paper, about 75 to 80 percent of the world population use herbal (alternative) medicines, mainly in developing countries, for primary health care because of their better acceptability with human body and lesser side effects. Can natural remedies really manage hypertension? Find out more at: